Scars from Self-Injury

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Topic Title: Scars from Self-Injury
Created On: 05/06/2009 03:51 PM

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 08/22/2013 10:31 AM

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marie33

Posts: 152

I have come in contact with children who hurt themselves in various positions interacting with young people. Sometimes obvious scars were left behind, and other times they were not. Fortunately, the children I knew had access to therapy and eventually were able to overcome the propensity to hurt themselves. I look at every person who can rise above troubles to realize a better place as strong, amazing people. Actually, I have nothing but admiration for them. For the ones who still hurt themselves, there is help out there. We are all traveling through this life with scars, whether visible or invisible. Therefore, be mindful to be kind to one another, it feels so much better than the opposite.


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 05/30/2012 02:42 PM

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Cher777

Posts: 288

The advice you have provided seems sound. There is no reason to be ashamed of self-injury scars. Some people have internal scars equally as significant. The major difference? This type of scar is not visible.

I used to work with children who occasionally inflicted injuries to their arms, legs, or other parts of the body. However, a good therapist, counselor, or sometimes just a listening ear was often able to circumvent the behavior.

Bottom line? Our scars, no matter how they got there, can be sources of strength. In fact, they tell volumes about how we find the ability to overcome various struggles.
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 05/06/2009 03:51 PM

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awartonick

Posts: 16

There should be no shame or guilt in having scars that result from self-injury. Inflicting physical damage is a way to manage overwhelming emotions that appear to have no other solutions. The immediate relief from feelings stress and helplessness is why some people continue to use self-destructive methods as a primary coping mechanism. Factors that play a role in repetitive self-injury include: biological predispositions, problems with neurotransmitters, and lack of experience dealing with intense waves of emotion, all which reduce psychological tension quickly and produce sensations of calm. Although it might seem as though there are no other alternatives and reaching out to others for support is impossible, there are actually many positive techniques to handle situations that induce self-injury. At the moment where self-injury appears to be inevitable, try substitute activities equivalent to the intense feelings you’re experiencing, which will provide a distraction and soothe the urge to self-injure, such as an activity that creates a sharp physical sensation. Above all, it is crucial to recognize the impact that self-injury has on your emotional stability and that you are not alone in your experiences. Don’t be afraid to reach out to a close confidant to express how you feel. There will always be someone to provide support and encouragement, whether it is a family member, a friend, or a professional counselor.
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